Uguisu Value Newsletter Sample Available

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7/23 update: The 3rd issue of Uguisu Value will be published by this Sunday afternoon ahead of the Monday open in Tokyo. See below for other updates.

7/5 update: The 3rd issue of Uguisu Value will be published later this month. I’ve been monitoring valuations and researching a narrowed selection of companies for the 3rd issue’s feature best idea. I’m excited to finalize and publish the 3rd issue. Meantime, I’m equally excited about the first two best ideas from the first and second issues, which are up 20% and 8% respectively since publishing — since I’m targeting 200%+ upside in the first instance and a baseline double in the second. Details of Uguisu Value are available here. After you have had a chance to see details at the aforementioned link, if you’re interested in a free sample of the first issue of Uguisu Value please request via email: contact@steventowns.com.

*** “Safety in Value” on Seeking Alpha has just published an interview with me. He had excellent questions and was very kind to edit and format them. If you’d like to know more about my background and Uguisu Value, you’ll want to read our interview: http://seekingalpha.com/article/3301795-finding-value-in-japanese-stocks-an-interview-with-steven-towns

5/27 update: Patience and discipline. Multi-year highs in Japan. Not as many interesting (valuation) companies, but still plenty for discerning investors. My best ideas published thus far in Uguisu Value and some of my other core positions remain attractive (not only in terms of potential upside but also given their operating businesses, management, and etc.) despite their higher stock prices. I target baseline 2x opportunities and I manage a highly concentrated portfolio.

4/14 update: As of the Tues. 4/14 close in Tokyo, the featured company in the first issue of Uguisu Value is up 28% since publishing in January. See below to request a full sample copy. The second issue’s featured write-up is down approx. 3% since publishing. With the company currently available at less than a 5% premium to the publish date’s price per share, new subscriptions will begin with the Q2 issue.

3/29 update: I published the Q2 issue of Uguisu Value on 3/29 at around 1:30 pm JST, 12:30 am New York. See below re. Q1 sample and for subscriptions. 

3/21: Japanese stocks have done well in this first quarter (the fiscal third quarter for many in Japan) with the closely watched Nikkei 225 up 12% (+16% from its ytd low). I released the first issue of the Uguisu Value newsletter in mid-January. Details of Uguisu Value are available here. In short, the purpose of the letter is to identify and write-up one best idea (selected from within the Japanese micro and smaller-cap universe) each issue. The premise and inspiration: capitalizing on circle-of-competence and portfolio concentration underpinned by a margin of safety (e.g. Berkowitz, Buffett and Soros among others).

After you have had a chance to see details at the above link, if you’re interested in a free sample of the first issue of Uguisu Value please request via email: contact@steventowns.com. Compared to the deep-value style investment in the first issue, the second one will be more in the moat/compounder category (higher ROE; attractive valuation with growth catalysts; solid MOS) and its market cap is between US$500mn-$1bn. Samples will not be made available for the Q2 and future issues.

Recap: Debt, JGBs, Value Investing Simplicity, and Japanese Stocks

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I’m going to see how posting a daily summary of my tweets goes. I’ve always felt that tweets are too ephemeral and despite the excellent information and leads that do get shared,  there’s far too much action/noise/distraction on Twitter. There is at least a “favorite” button, but the weak search function and inability to bookmark and sort, is something I hope Twitter gets right, soon. I’m starting these summaries for my own benefit — a quick recap of what I tweeted, retweeted, and favorited — and I’m fine if it remains for an audience of one and would of course be thrilled if others benefit. Highlights:

Continue reading

Nomura’s individual Japanese investor survey (May 2014)

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Nomura’s (NYSE: NMR) (TYO: 8604) monthly “Individual Investor Survey” was released late last week. This is worth an investor’s time to flip through for a read on the psychology of the Japanese investor. Nomura also lists participants’ most-watched stocks (keep reading for a screen cap) and includes questions that deal with current developments (this month’s concern the consumption tax hike impact and shareholder meetings). I discussed Nomura’s survey as a resource in my book, Investing in Japan. The survey is one of a few resources that will enhance English-language access to, and understanding of, the Japanese market. Continue reading

Japan: one-trick ponies, exporters, yen, QE, EWJ, real estate, domestic demand; some sound conclusions

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Value investors will still find excellent valuations in Japan despite the market’s gains over the past several weeks. As I say again, in my latest exclusive at Seeking Alpha, “Investing in Japan Beyond the Platitudes,” the most interesting opportunities are in domestic-demand small/mid-cap companies. I’ve received a number of messages asking about WisdomTree’s hedged Japan Equity fund (DXJ). Yes, DXJ has done well, much better than iShares Japan (EWJ), in this rally. However, I’m not a big fan of DXJ for some of the same reasons I don’t like EWJ. Over 270 portfolio holdings for DXJ and 300 for EWJ mean outside of  the top-few positions no one stock is really going to move the needle; the top holdings are not dissimilar from the benchmark indexes nor the one-trick pony mutual fund managers. Exporters are already cyclical and the demand/supply (selling) of their shares only makes them more cyclical — this is even more a concern should positions get closed en masse in DXJ given its smaller asset base that has surged only recently.

Finally, I don’t see the yen “blowing up” — it’s not as simple as some may wish or have been led to believe to see a currency like the yen or a country like Japan “blow up” in a straight line. Beware macro pontification coattailing. The great 2005 Nikkei rally saw a roughly 10% weakening of the yen. Overnight, Economy Minister Akira Amari warned excessive yen appreciation may benefit exporters but would hurt people’s livelihoods. The business press is concluding Minister Amari as having suggested the yen has weakened enough. In fact, too weak of a yen begins to hurt exporters if materials costs don’t start to decrease. In this sense, the input environment is quite different than ’05; ditto the strength of the global economy now vs. then.

Simplistic Japan trade, best wishes in 2013

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Quite a rally in Japan over the past six weeks. I’m happy there’s some excitement about Japanese stocks but at the same time I’m worried the hot money and sentiment will prove truly ephemeral. Institutional investors in the U.S. are mostly one-trick ponies when it comes to Japan. I discuss this in my book. Retail investors often get burned going long iShares Japan (EWJ), not exactly their fault though with the sudden swarm of Japan pundits pitching long-Japan/short-yen, all paying obligatory homage to EWJ. For the record, EWJ is not the Nikkei (N225) and though it is a convenient proxy in conversation, it is a poor one in practice.

With that being said, Japan could remain the hot trade into 2013 but it’s worth knowing what’s going on, notably with the impact of the yen. Expectations seem to be quite high (too high!?) that inflation can be created and this will somehow right Japan’s ‘doomed’ economy. I’m doubtful of manufacturing real growth with money schemes. I also don’t believe Japan’s economy is doomed. In fact my favorite stocks are mostly domestic-demand companies. Grab a copy of my book if you haven’t already. Meantime, hope you enjoy my exclusive article at Seeking Alpha: “Real numbers and thoughts behind a weak yen and Japan’s exporters.” Best wishes in 2013!

Japan’s demographic sweet spot?

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Longtime Japan observer, Jesper Koll, currently head of equity research at JPMorgan Japan, argues Japan is in a “demographic sweet spot.” In a recent interview with Bloomberg (see video clip queued from 2:35 mark*) he made some key points rarely shared when Japan’s demographics are discussed, one being that wage deflation is ending. His focus was more on the opportunities surrounding taking care of Japan’s elderly and the likelihood that they will spend their trillions of yen on comfort. A point often forgotten by those outside of Japan is that the aging society means higher-paid older workers are retiring, easing compensation expenses for companies. Importantly, this situation also allows companies to pay younger workers better, which in turn should allow for more, if not earlier, possibilities of family formation.

I don’t agree that Japan should hike its sales tax despite its deficit (discussed in the first portion of the video). With all the net cash on balance sheets and positive earnings across Japanese companies, I’d argue there are more clever ways to enhance tax revenues and consumer spending rather than sticking consumers with a tax hike. If you’re interested in what this means for investing in Japan, I cover demographics, individual’s composition of net assets and how little is actually in equities, and much more in my book, Investing in Japan.

*Ignore strike-through text of link. It was active at time of posting.

Barron’s on the Nikkei’s 2012 reversal

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Barron’s Kopin Tan writes about the Nikkei’s reversal this year in the International Trader – Asia section (first half discusses Prada’s valuation) of this week’s edition. After being the best-performing market in Q1, the Nikkei has slid 16% since its peak in late March. The vicissitudes of the market should not weigh on value investors. In a phone conversation I told Tan that the rallying and retreating is a recurring theme for Japan.  I am thankful for the cheaper stocks and see excellent opportunity in domestic demand stocks, yes, the debt-ridden, deflation defatigued, and demographically doomed domestic economy. I’m being facetious of course. But as I watched fiscal year-end March earnings and the next fiscal year forecasts come in, there were more and more companies reporting and/or forecasting record earnings. The persistently strong yen is far from ideal, but take a moment and think about the fact that the majority of Japanese companies have remained profitable despite the horrible aftermath of 3/11, the severe flooding in Thailand only a few months later (manufacturing facilities impacted), and of course the ongoing uncertainty in the EU and elsewhere.

To learn all about investing in Japan (comprehensive A-Z overview of the nuts and bolts of the market and its players, as well as key idiosyncrasies and enigmas explained) including why the debt, deflation, and demographic fears are overblown, see my book, Investing in Japan. If you are currently investing in Japan by way of the iShares Japan ETF (EWJ) or another Japan-focused ETF or a mutual fund, you’ll definitely want to see how your money is actually being managed. Japan’s broadly undervalued market (0.9-times reported book value among large caps and significantly cheaper for smaller caps) and abundance of deeply undervalued  (net-nets) and very attractively valued (“GARP”) stocks  means there are multiple viable investment approaches. Don’t be misled by tunnel-visioned macro opinion jockeying at one extreme and pedantic fault-finding on the other. Shares of Unicharm (Tokyo: 8113), a leading Japanese diaper and hygiene product maker, rose four-fold last decade.

Investing in Japan book update

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First, I want to thank readers that have purchased my book, Investing in Japan. So far the feedback has been overwhelmingly positive and I’m very appreciate of the reader reviews, including by: Continue reading

No Stock Market as Undervalued and as Misunderstood as Japan

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Japanese stocks have done very well in 2012 and of course the weakening yen has increasingly more to do with the rally; deservedly so for the people of Japan. Otherwise, and unless Japanese stocks continue to do well, they could become neglected once again. Not necessarily a bad thing for value investors, and regardless of the rally to-date, valuations in Japan remain extremely compelling. Allow me to introduce my book, Investing in Japan: No stock market is as undervalued and as misunderstood as Japan, just released this month. Continue reading

M&A is key for Japanese equities in 2010 – Goldman Sachs

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Reuters (article in Japanese) reports that Goldman Sachs issued a report earlier this week that argues M&A will be the major theme for Japanese equities in 2010. Having a ‘macro’ investment theme for the start of each new year is a ritual for brokerages in Japan, although it seems no one ever has the resolve to action or follow through; and the M&A theme itself is not a new one. So Goldman repeats known information that Japan (equities) was overly victimized in the financial crisis and remains largely defenseless to external shocks. With ROE so low, domestic demand remaining sluggish, and overseas competition ever-intensifying, the best bet for Japanese companies is to merge and restructure. M&A/restructuring should boost top-line growth, says Goldman, which also should help margins, and therefore drive stock prices higher.

However, the longstanding problem with inward M&A is that reorganization is easier said than done (as heads, and tails in the form of non-core subsidiaries, tend not to roll in Japan), the volume of M&A has often disappointed, and the size of deals has been on the small side.  Nevertheless, all of that means there is still great opportunity in Japan. The best opportunities appear to continue to be in smaller-sized deals, where there are plenty of gems, and in listed subsidiaries. Goldman is said to favor retail, machinery, services, land transport, non-bank financials, warehousing, and real estate — the underlying idea is that these industries are the most fragmented.

Bottoms-up then, as 2009 is winding down and 2010 is poised to be the year of M&A (at least thematically or in a macro sense).