Nomura’s individual Japanese investor survey (May 2014)

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Nomura’s (NYSE: NMR) (TYO: 8604) monthly “Individual Investor Survey” was released late last week. This is worth an investor’s time to flip through for a read on the psychology of the Japanese investor. Nomura also lists participants’ most-watched stocks (keep reading for a screen cap) and includes questions that deal with current developments (this month’s concern the consumption tax hike impact and shareholder meetings). I discussed Nomura’s survey as a resource in my book, Investing in Japan. The survey is one of a few resources that will enhance English-language access to, and understanding of, the Japanese market. Continue reading

IIJ: cutting edge Japanese IT company at dial-up prices

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Internet Initiative Japan (IIJI) (3774) is being overlooked by the market of late after a run last year to a multi-year high. Poised for a record fiscal year (which ends in a couple weeks), no doubt 2012 – 2013 will prove to be even more impressive. See my write-up, which appears as an exclusive premium article on Seeking Alpha. Also, my just-released book, Investing in Japan, is now available on Amazon. Continue reading

Japan to be world’s 3rd largest economy is good news

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“China poised to pass Japan as world’s No. 2 economy,” reports CNN.com.  Q2 GDP figures from Japan and China show the latter exceeding the former, $1.34 trillion vs. $1.29 trillion. In 2009, it was Japan ahead for the full year, at $5.07 trillion compared to China at $4.91 trillion, according to the IMF. Given the two lost decades now in Japan, this was only a matter of time. Jesper Koll’s (veteran Japan economy expert now with JP Morgan in Tokyo) simple forecast (see quote below) represents a real and substantial opportunity for Japan. This is not a new idea or sudden realization by any means, but it is far more tangible now than ever before; it is becoming more palpable given recent developments such as the Japanese government actively courting Chinese tourists. Continue reading

Unlocking value in Japanese real estate

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Christopher Dillon, a Hong Kong-based entrepreneur, writer, and real estate investor, is the author of two books about real estate (his first covered property transactions in Hong Kong, and his latest published this May, covers Japan). Landed: The guide to buying property in Japan, is a must-read, not just for those considering buying a property in Japan, but also for individuals who are already homeowners, those who may be interested in refinancing, and there’s even something to be learned by long-term residents who are renting. In the very least, Landed is a ready-reference for the aforementioned individuals, and for investors who stand to gain from a better understanding of how real estate works in Japan. Continue reading

M&A is key for Japanese equities in 2010 – Goldman Sachs

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Reuters (article in Japanese) reports that Goldman Sachs issued a report earlier this week that argues M&A will be the major theme for Japanese equities in 2010. Having a ‘macro’ investment theme for the start of each new year is a ritual for brokerages in Japan, although it seems no one ever has the resolve to action or follow through; and the M&A theme itself is not a new one. So Goldman repeats known information that Japan (equities) was overly victimized in the financial crisis and remains largely defenseless to external shocks. With ROE so low, domestic demand remaining sluggish, and overseas competition ever-intensifying, the best bet for Japanese companies is to merge and restructure. M&A/restructuring should boost top-line growth, says Goldman, which also should help margins, and therefore drive stock prices higher.

However, the longstanding problem with inward M&A is that reorganization is easier said than done (as heads, and tails in the form of non-core subsidiaries, tend not to roll in Japan), the volume of M&A has often disappointed, and the size of deals has been on the small side.  Nevertheless, all of that means there is still great opportunity in Japan. The best opportunities appear to continue to be in smaller-sized deals, where there are plenty of gems, and in listed subsidiaries. Goldman is said to favor retail, machinery, services, land transport, non-bank financials, warehousing, and real estate — the underlying idea is that these industries are the most fragmented.

Bottoms-up then, as 2009 is winding down and 2010 is poised to be the year of M&A (at least thematically or in a macro sense).

Japanese individual investors saying no thank you to JGBs

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The Mainichi Shimbun (original in Japanese) reported early Thursday that Japanese Government Bonds’ (JGBs) popularity is rapidly falling among individual investors. Beginning in 2003, the Ministry of Finance (MoF) has sold two types of JGBs (a fixed-rate 5-year and a variable-rate 10-year) four times a year to individual investors. However, as interest rates have been held at zero (remember ZIRP) to near-zero levels for years, Japanese individual investors may finally be voting with their purses. The October 5-year issue had a coupon of 0.6%, the lowest since the program began in ’03, and less than half the peak coupon rate of 1.5% in July ’07.

The MoF now only expects to raise Y1.3 trillion (US$14.3B) this year from individual investors, down from a prior estimate of Y2.4 trillion, and considerably lower than the record Y7.2 trillion raised in ’05. Through the end of this September, individual investors held Y27.7 trillion or 4.6% of JGBs outstanding. The MoF argues that recent individual investor reluctance for JGBs is not an issue because their weighting is so low. However, it goes without saying, as the article accurately points out, that it is an issue, as the government is poised to take on even more debt in the face of declining tax revenues.

In fact, the MoF is reportedly planning to introduce a fixed three-year JGB for individual investors next July. At this time, it’s hard to imagine a warm welcome, let alone a return to previous years’ embracing of JGBs. The MoF may be right in not being very worried, since it can just pressure domestic institutional investors to pick up the slack. So whether individual investors like it or not, it’s probably the case that they will remain proxy buyers of JGBs.

Japan watchers and investors will readily recognize and perhaps even sympathize with the plight of domestic savers. The golden days of the yen carry trade seem so distant with US$1/Y90-level support so sticky. It’s a real shame that Japanese companies don’t pay quarterly dividends as is common practice in the U.S., for instance, since household, quality Japanese companies are in some cases paying dividends at multiples of what JGBs offer. The desperate search for yield could be called off. Instead of chasing the latest overseas investment fad or making risky leveraged forex trades, maybe something more productive could be achieved.

Disclosure: The author has no direct exposure to JGBs, and does not believe a crisis is looming for Japan despite David Einhorn’s position, and in spite of the serious problems the country faces but continues to bundle into a bumbling status-quo. 

Domestic and overseas factors a plenty for Japan

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More often than not, it is overseas factors that have the largest influence on trading in Japan. However, from time to time there is enough commotion domestically that also warrants the attention of investors. Unfortunately, the cacophony coming out of the government these days is more concerning than usual (e.g. Japan Post management/reform, debt moratorium, JAL, etc). But let’s not forget earnings season is here.

Following is a market summary of last week’s action courtesy of the Tokyo Stock Exchange:

Despite the decline in the American exchanges reflecting weak corporate financial statements, the market continued with slight gains from the previous week backed by the strong tone of the Asian stock market. Further into the week, rising prices of oil and other commodities in the commodities market led to buying centered around resource stocks as the market strenghtened. Heading into the weekend, while there were positives with the yen falling to the 91 yen-per-dollar level, easing concerns over deterioration in corporate export estimates, many uncertainties such as the reconstruction of JAL and the direction on the moratorium remained. In addition, a wait-and-see sentiment grew amongst investors as they chose to wait for the announcement of July-September period financial statements by domestic corporations. As a result, the market struggled to make any headway.

Global Central Bank Rates – October 16, 2009

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Global central bank rates (Brazil 8.75%, South Africa 7.0%, Mexico 4.5%, Australia 3.25%, New Zealand 2.5%, ECB 1.0%, UK 0.5%, USA 0.25%, Canada 0.25%, Switzerland 0.25%, Japan 0.11%) as of October 16, 2009. See chart image below. [Source: Bloomberg; Central Bank web sites]

Global Central Bank Rates - October 16, 2009

Upcoming talks at Japan Society New York

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For those in the area, below is a list of upcoming talks hosted by Japan Society New York. Click the respective link for additional information and for registration.

Oct. 20   Financial Reporting Reliability & Transparency: Activities of FASB & the ASBJ during the Financial Crisis

Oct. 27   Boeing & Japan: A Strategic Partnership for 21st-Century Aerospace Leadership

Oct. 28   How Foreign Companies are Remaking the American Dream

Nov. 3   Wanted: A New Engine for Global Economic Recovery