Berkshire Beyond Buffett: Final Chapters

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This is the final post of my live-tweeting and highlighting of professor Larry Cunningham’s book, Berkshire Beyond Buffett. I’ve practically run out of superlatives…. ValueWalk (dot-com) reported Berkshire Beyond Buffett was among the top-10 books purchased in 2014 by its readers. I suspect the momentum will continue this year. If you’ve missed any of the tweets or posts, see them in order here: IIIIII, and IV (and follow on Twitter: @ActiveInvesting).

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Berkshire Beyond Buffett: Modesty and Simplicity

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This is my fourth installment of notes and summary tweets of Larry Cunningham’s perspicacious book, Berkshire Beyond Buffett: The Enduring Value of Values. If you’ve missed any of the tweets or posts, see them in order here: I, II, and III (and follow on Twitter: @ActiveInvesting). I’ve selectively shared nuggets from Larry’s book and I’m finding Twitter’s 140 character limit to be just-right for capturing some of the highlights to share with others that will also spark my memory of the greater detail in the book; this also preserves the bulk of Larry’s hard work.

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Berkshire Beyond Buffett: Values

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Here’s my latest installment of notes I’ve compiled while I continue to read Larry Cunningham’s wonderful book, Berkshire Beyond Buffett: The Enduring Value of Values. Chapter 6 (“Kinship”) is one of my favorites thus far. It seemed to come alive and really epitomize “the enduring value of values.” I will continue to shares notes in this way as it’s much more efficient (posting a summary of my live-tweets) than trying to go back and put my notes into prose. One-third finished reading, I can already say that Berkshire Beyond Buffett is a keeper for me and should be on your reading list if not already. See my earlier posts (I and II).

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Berkshire Beyond Buffett: Insurance Notes

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Berkshire Beyond Buffett - Larry Cunningham (Columbia Business School)Larry Cunningham is one of the most respected authors who has written about Warren Buffett and Berkshire Hathaway. His Berkshire Beyond Buffett: The Enduring Value of Values is proving to be an informative read thus far — last week I posted some notes and takeaways from the first few chapters. This time I’m sharing more of the same from the remainder of chapter 3 as well as chapter 4, which is the first chapter of the second part of the book.

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Susan Decker on the Magic of Berkshire Hathaway’s Returns

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Susan Decker’s recent panel discussion comments pointed out some of the magic behind Berkshire Hathaway’s returns. There is nothing new for Berkshire followers and investors, except the tax-free comment that Decker made got me thinking. Buffett’s baby is simple conceptually (i.e. float-supported — Decker didn’t mention float, by the way — with cash flow rich capital allocation to, and flow back from, operating subsidiaries and portfolio securities) and has performed brilliantly in terms of the annual and cumulative profits/investment returns achieved. See’s Candies is one heck of an example (see the BBB link below).

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Business Adventures Book Summary

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I followed the herd and read Business Adventures (by the late John Brooks, originally published in 1969) over the summer like many others did after learning the book was Bill Gates’ favorite all-time business book (even better, it came recommended to him from none other than Warren Buffett). I previously posted some of my favorite quotes and notes from the excellent first chapter that covers the May 1962 crash, a flash crash of sorts of the time. Reading that post before or after my summary thoughts about Business Adventures that follow below is worth your time.

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Berkshire Beyond Buffett Notes

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The rent is too damn high and the weather is too damn cold. Can I interest you in an all-weather portfolio? All kidding aside, if not already in your possession, get Larry Cunningham’s Berkshire Beyond Buffett: The Enduring Value of Values and enjoy the latest of Larry’s deep dives into Berkshire Hathaway (BRK.A, BRK.B). To keep these posts short I’ll share some interesting Berkshire Beyond Buffett notes every few chapters or so.  Continue reading

Nomura’s Individual Japanese Investor Survey (June 2014)

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Nomura’s (NYSE: NMR) (TYO: 8604) monthly “Individual Investor Survey” was released yesterday. (Here’s my walk-through for May). Japanese investors are slightly more bullish, while they remain concerned about international affairs with a particular interest in forex developments, naturally. Their top sector focus (most appealing/unappealing) was unchanged: they like capital goods and autos, somewhat surprisingly in my opinion; bearish on transportation and utilities, unsurprisingly. Japanese investors seem to always have a place in their heart for higher yielding currencies, hence their fondness for the Australian dollar, though they also like the yen, which is interesting because 65% of respondents see a weaker yen on the horizon. So what investment do Japanese investors like most?  Continue reading

Three unreported reasons behind Japan’s declining wages

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Value investors tend not to care much about monthly wages and labor reports published by the government. That’s not to say compensation practices and levels don’t matter at a particular company one is researching. In Japan it’s just they matter for different reasons. Here’s why wages seem like they are always reported to be falling in Japan:

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One too many raw deals for shareowners

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I recently wrote an article published exclusively on Seeking Alpha, entitled, “Why GE’s Buyback is a Raw Deal for Shareholders.” Share repurchase programs are trumpeted out and rarely questioned.  I believe that many, but not enough, investors understand that buybacks can be largely self-serving and hardly in shareowners’ best interests. I encourage you to read the above linked story (link visible in full article view) on GE and note the fact that the impact of share buybacks when looking at shares outstanding is very dismal; stock price performance is equally unimpressive. Continue reading